Lawn Maintenance Tips


We Educate Our Customers

By demonstrating our expertise in the field of landscaping via educating the public, many potential customers hire us once they understand the level of quality and effort required to maintain a beautiful landscape. They also value our knowledge base and therefore trust that we will provide them with the best services available.
For more frequently updated tips, please visit my blog at http://phillhankslandscaping.wordpress.com/

Sincerely,

Phil Hanks
owner of Prestige Landscape Management, LLC - now joined with Prolifiscapes, Inc.
Fall

I start the list with Fall, because Fall is the most crucial season of the year for getting your landscape and lawn prepared for the next 12 months. We can help improve your lawn beginning in other seasons, but this is when you really see results for months to come. Fall is an excellent time to plant in many parts of the country. If you plant, make sure you water new plantings well for the first couple of weeks so that the roots can established. Once established, most shrubs require about one third the rainfall of turf grass. Also, take care to sufficiently water your lawn as it prepares for its dormancy. Avoid walking on grass when it is lacking water or dormant, especially when there is frost on the ground, which will break grass blades in two. Don't forget to plant bulbs in the fall, including tulips, daffodils, and hyacinth, for a bright, beautiful spring display. And remember, any season is the right time to make sure your shrubs and trees are properly mulched in order to moderate temperatures, maintain soil moisture, deter weeds, and enhance the attractiveness of your yard.


Winter
Winter is an excellent time to prune trees and shrubs. Many plants have lost their leaves, making it easier to see their framework and decide which branches to remove. However, do not prune plants that bloom in the spring, as you could remove next spring's flowers. Prune these plants after the blooms fall off in the spring. This includes azaleas! In most parts of the country, you might need to water your lawn, even during dormancy, if it doesn't rain for three to four weeks. Remember, just because it's dormant does not mean it is dead. If nothing comes up in the Spring, then it's safe to say it was dead (not good). Winter is also a good time to mulch your trees and ornamental plants to help moderate temperatures and soil moisture. A lot of people that use pine-needles for mulch put them down once their trees have lost most of their leaves. This way things look fresh for months to come & nice and leaf free for the Spring.
Spring
Spring is a reasonable time for planting in North Carolina, especially with increased rainfall & plant growth. It is important to hold off on planting until you believe the last chances of frost have passed. You should give your lawn equipment and irrigation a thorough checkup, making sure they're ready to perform optimally. Ensure that your mulch is thick enough to moderate soil temperatures and moisture. Approximately a 2"-3" thickness is fairly standard. Avoid mulching directly around the trunks of trees and ornamental plants, because piling mulch around the base of a tree or shrub can result in rot.
Summer

In most parts of the country,
 Summer means watering. To provide your landscape and lawn with the correct amount of water, learn about the specific needs for your lawn, trees, shrubs, and ornamental plants. This is important to avoid drought stress, but also to avoid over-watering, which can be as detrimental as drought. And remember, any season is the right time to make sure your shrubs and trees are properly mulched in order to moderate temperatures, maintain soil moisture, deter weeds, and enhance the attractiveness of your yard. However, avoid mulching directly around the trunks of trees and ornamental plants, as this can lead to rot.






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